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Venus, Mars and Saturn will form a celestial triangle to be discovered



Venus, Mars and Saturn will form a celestial triangle to be discovered


Between Sunday 27 March and Monday 28 March it will be possible to attend a very special event; a celestial triangle between Venus, Mars and Saturn at the first light of dawn. On the second day, the crescent Moon will also join them, making this group of planets really bright and visible to the naked eye. Obviously if we want to see the show in more detail, we must take binoculars or telescope.

To see this event clearly, experts recommend going out at least half an hour before sunrise. Just look to the east where especially on Monday the Moon will be bright in the sky and Venus will be visible to the naked eye. The clouds surrounding the planet are highly reflective and the world will shine at about -4.7 magnitude.

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Celestial triangle, Venus, Mars and Saturn align

Slightly beyond below Venus, which is positioned in the upper left, we find Saturn the planet of the rings. At this moment Saturn is slightly weaker and is at 0.7 magnitude, still visible to the naked eye. Just think that the people can see up to 6 of magnitude in dark sky conditions. In the end, Mars it will be to the right of both planets. It’s approaching magnitude 1 and it should be easy to spot, with its red color.

As an extra it will also be possible to spot Jupiter which will be much lower on the horizon. Jupiter is approximately of magnitude -2 and may be more visible if we go out a little earlier in the evening. Thanks to the ecliptic it is not infrequently possible to see these alignments between planets. The trio of planets should still be bright in the pre-dawn sky for the next few daysso we can still keep an eye on them if we lose alignment due to clouds or programming issues.

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Image from NASA via cfa.Harvad