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If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does it make a sound?



If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does it make a sound?


The world is still full of unanswered questions. Some of these try to describe possible life on planets other than our own; others hope to unearth secrets that were once hidden. Still others help us understand more about our mind. In the latter category there is a question that could be interesting: if a tree falls in the forest and there was no one to hear it, it still has emitted a sound?

In an attempt to give an answer, an attempt has been made to draw up the perspectives of science and philosophy, finally offering an explanation that not only addresses the immediate answer to this question, but also the implications it has for an understanding of our mind and way. in which we see, understand and interpret the world around us.

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If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does it make a sound?

Probably, if no one listens, there is no sound, but that does not mean that there are no sound or acoustic waves affecting the environment. So, the answer may be “no”. But it is clear that this does not really cover the whole phenomenon since, although there is an absence of sound, there are acoustic waves that can interact with the environment.

But what is sound really?

We refer to the Penrose scale, where the position of the steps makes you believe you are going up or down perpetually – when in reality you are just turning. But, because of what it has made itself perceive, “reality” considers that there is movement. The brain creates an illusion of perception which is not really connected to physical stimuli “.

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In the case of the Penrose scale, our senses make us believe that we see and experience something that does not happen (an ascent or a descent). The same can happen with sound. All because our perception – the moment when the vibratory particles pass into our ears and these “translate” them into peaks of electricity that are transferred into the brain – is what really produces “sounds” to the acoustic stimuli.

In other words, without the “interpretation” of our ears, they would be just vibratory particles in the air. So without an ear to “translate” the acoustic waves of the falling tree in the middle of the forest, its sound simply could not come into being.